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Setting up a dedicated server for a Tor hidden service

1 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-12 21:01
How can i set up a external server to be only available on a Tor hidden service?
set up a dedicated server for a Tor hidden service? Can the the server be anywhere in the world,?and how i would use SSH or PuTTY for customization.?
Any one here ever try this??
2 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-12 23:48
>>1
Nobody is going to step you through it fucktard. Try YouTube for a tutorial then kys after
3 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-13 02:34
>>1
Sorry for bad grammar,
Am eurofag
4 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-13 05:21
>>2
Fuck you too kind anon?
5 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-13 08:08
>>1
can't even configure tor/nginx properly

set server/vhost to listen on localhost:whateverport
use HiddenServicePort porttoaccesshiddenserviceover 127.0.0.1:portdaemonislisteningon
6 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-13 10:55
>>1
>>5
https://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-onion-service

Can the the server be anywhere in the world?
that's kind of the point of tor

and how i would use SSH or PuTTY for customization?
like you normally would with servers, only over a hidden service and with torify ssh to connect rather than vanilla ssh
7 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-13 13:42
TOR network is compromised and filled with snooper nodes.
8 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-13 16:36
>>7
then it's a good thing hidden service traffic doesn't go through exit nodes and makes 6 hops instead of 3, making correlating traffic by controlling relays and nodes much more improbably successful
9 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-13 19:23
>>7
besides, tor's goal is anonymity, not confidentiality; you should be using encrypted protocols like https and ssh if you're using tor. hidden services are even better in that they act as encrypted tunnels directly from clients to services rather than encrypted tunnels from the client to the exit node and a potentially unencrypted connection to the service as when accessing something on the clearnet, and MiTM attacks are virtually impossible barring a complete break of the underlying cryptographic primitives because the hidden service encryption public key signature is embedded into the hidden service url rather than relying on third party certificate authorities. so stop parroting what /bijou/ told you.
10 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-13 22:09
>>9
ISPs can identify TOR exit nodes, hack you and watch your traffic in and out
11 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-14 00:56
>>10
ISPs can identify TOR exit nodes
so ISPS can identify the public list of exit nodes, most of which are in data centres and have their own limited shell ISP company and assigned RIPE IP addresses to forward misuse inquiries to their own lawyers rather than their hoster's? COLOR ME SHOCKED LADDY
you mean guard nodes. and yes, obviously, unless you access tor using one of their unpublished obfuscated bridges to designed to deter detection and censorship of tor. ISPs can't hack you and neither can the cops without a warrant, which they're not going to get because someone is using a proxy server. and it doesn't matter if they're watching your tor traffic anyway because it's encrypted.
12 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-14 03:43
>>11
Good info except: ISPs can't hack you and neither can the cops without a warrant

Ref.: General Clapper's press conference in which he admitted NSA wire tapped US citizens without a warrant

Tor encryption has never been hacked but there are ways
13 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-14 06:30
>>10
[Your computer] > tor > encrypted request through isp to guard node > guard node > guard node > ect. > destination > guard node a bunch (still encrypted btw) > isp > tor > your computer
14 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-14 09:17
>>11
Tell that to DPR
15 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-14 12:04
>>13
One a upon a time an ISP called Freedom Hosting had a lot of tor servers with cp and other shit on them. FBI got a warrant, waltzed into their data center and shut'em down. There are ways.
16 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-14 13:31
>>12
not everybody is american. we have mandatory key disclosure laws here and even a wiretapping warrant requires authorization from a very high level law enforcement seniority. most of the deanonymization attacks are either novel and quickly migitated or involve expensive 0days/exploiting outdated software
>>14
>>15
neither of those were busted directly through deanonimzation. dpr was a dumbass on multiple levels and freedom hosting's owner was targeted with a web browser 0day
17 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-14 17:38
>>16
without a warrant
DPR.
Ilegal arrest and prosecution on multiple levels and still sitting in jail. The law wont protect you
18 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-14 20:25
>>17
they didn't hack him. they arrested him and seized his (encrypted but on and unattended) laptop on money laundering, conspiracy to commission serveral assassinations and narcotics trafficking after an investigation and the silk road server was found because it was contacting recaptcha directly rather than through an anonymized connection, which the FBI asked/subpoena'd google for.
19 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-14 23:12
>>7
RETARD tor was a honeypot from the start, there is nothing to compromise
20 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-15 01:59
>>18
It wasnt guard nodes that got him? I know the fbi stole millions in bitcoin from him and wernt prosecuted.
21 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-15 04:47
>>20
dread pirate roberts had posted about developing hidden service software under the same name he was operating silk road under. using his home connection and his real email address. the early traffic confirmation attack explotation was silk road 2.0, which was a very clever academic attack that involved lots of expensive interpol-controlled relays exploiting an oversight in tor's implementation that was handed over to the FBI instead of to the tor developers, and promptly mitigated after it was discovered a few months later.
22 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-15 07:39
>>21
my point being, DPR was a moron and while a few attacks against tor have been found in the past, they've been expensive, slow, and short-lived. maybe if you're an extremely high profile target it may be possible to deanonymize you with a research team's work and a several hundred thousand dollars international law enforcement operation if they get lucky but wtf are doing on tor that that's an actual threat to you? tor is an amazing tool for activists, whistleblowers, and people who don't trust the government of the country they're holidaying in or coffeeshop they're reading the news in but unfortunately it's not used more thanks to misinformation and a shady reputation.
23 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-15 10:28
>>22
no RETARD tor was created to centralize crime. They know who fucking uses it and what they use it for. They have statistics on what it is used for which they openly share

for obvious reasons they don't catch the small fish because that would ruin the whole purpose of a centralized crime network
24 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-15 13:15
>>23
oh, blow it out of you ass you uneducated armchair infosec conspiracy theorist.
25 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-15 16:02
>>22
people who dont trust the government
use program created by the government
26 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-15 18:50
>>24
you are so fucking unintelligent
retards like yourself literally think that having javascript enabled is what gets the big fish taken down
27 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-15 21:40
>>25
AES was chosen by the NSA but that doesn't mean it isn't secure after 20 years of academic scrutiny. It was developed by the US navy's R&D department and then handed over to the EFF because it's pretty obvious that someone is a spy or such if the only people using it is the US military.

>>26
you're a moron, kill yourself please and stop pretending to understand netsec.
28 Name: Anonymous 2018-10-16 00:30
>>27
gullible low iq scum literally using honeypot openly developed by US gov

fucking kill yourself retard

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